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Ireland & Cheese

When we think of Ireland our mind automatically conjures up images of fast green landscapes.The result of Ireland’s mild and equable climate is an abundance of rich grass, responding to the mild moist air.

This grass in turn gives the Irish farmer a unique competitive advantage for raising cattle. For a cow to produce the best milk she needs the best grass. Irish cows roam free and eat a hearty grass fed diet. Their milk is rich in omega-3 and beta-carotene which makes smooth, buttery and golden cheese. Goat farming in Ireland is a very specialized area of farming, with more than three-quarters of goats in herds of ten or less. Our goat farming has produced award winning cheese, such as Knockdrinna Farmhouse Cheese. Knockdrinna was named the supreme champion of British cheeses in September 2011. Ireland is known as the land of a thousand welcomes. Irish people by nature enjoy tradition, food and good company.

 Traditionally cheese making in Ireland was characterized by large scale cheddar production. In the late 1970′s Ireland realized the potential of farmhouse cheese production and a few artisan Irish cheese farmers led the way, and the rest is history. Along with the quality milk, it is the quality of the people behind Irish artisan cheese making that makes Irish cheese such a wonderful product. Combining creativity and innovation with respect for traditional craft simplicity, Irish cheese makers are at the forefront of a new and diverse culture. The Irish farmstead cheese range offers an array of cheeses with an equally interesting story and family behind each one.

Irish farmstead cheeses are as pure and as natural as any food can be, and despite their wide and magnificent differences, they all share a common goal: the cheese must be as good as the cheese can possibly be.  “Making a living making something that matters” is how one farmstead cheese maker once described his working life.  What a memorable phrase that is, both so proud, and so modest, and it is an apt summary of Ireland’s farmstead cheese makers: they make something that matters, they are the poets of the land, and the magicians of milk.